Asian Mushroom Salad

Asian Salad#3

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons mild vegetable oil
  • 8 oz. mixed or single variety exotic mushrooms (Alba Clamshell, Brown Clamshell, or Trumpet Royale)
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh ginger root, grated (optional)
  • 2 Tablespoons toasted sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon Rice Vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon sugar
  • 6 ounces, about 4 cups, mixed baby lettuces – Arugula, frisée and baby spinach

Directions

  1. Heat vegetable oil in broad skillet on medium high. Add mushrooms, whole or sliced, Cook three minutes on high. Add ginger and remove from heat.
  2. Add remaining ingredients in order – toss with salad mix and serve immediately. There will be a pleasing contrast of cool and warm and the some of the greens will wilt just slightly.

Trumpet Royale with Cucumber and Ponzu

Mushrooms with cucumber and ponzu.

Here’s an easy, refreshing appetizer featuring ponzu, the Japanese sauce that is sometimes called “three tastes sauce” – for sweet, salty, and piquant. There are many commercial Ponzu sauces on the market. For a traditional one, look for yuzu (a type of Japanese citrus) on the ingredients list.

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 20 very thin slices of Trumpet Royale. (If you have a mandoline, now is the time to bust it out.)
  • 20 very thin slices of cucumber
  • 2 Tablespoons sliced green onion
  • 2 Tablespoons ponzu sauce (approximate)
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

Directions

  1. The Trumpet Royale may be cooked as your prefer. You can sauté in just a touch of oil, roast on a pan lightly coated with vegetable oil spray, or poach for three minutes in chicken broth or dashi.
  2. Whatever method you choose, when done and while still hot, sprinkle the mushrooms with a little ponzu, then put on a plate in the refrigerator until chilled. Mushrooms can be held for up to two days. If not using right away, cover tightly with plastic wrap.
  3. When ready to assemble, toss the sliced cucumber with 1 ½ Tablespoons of ponzu.
  4. Enjoy as a light and delicious side or starter.

Pickled Italian Mushrooms

Pickled Mushrooms with Beans

Ingredients

  • 8 oz. MYCOPIA brand mushrooms, single variety or mixed
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • ¼ cup water
  • ¼ cup white wine vinegar
  • 1 ½ tsps. sugar (optional)
  • ¼ tsp. whole black peppercorns
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. coriander seed
  • 1 small bay leaf
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 2 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil
  • 2-3 sprigs of thyme or oregano if available – add last

 Directions

  1. Separate small mushrooms into individual stems. Cut larger ones as desired.
  2. Put mushrooms and all ingredients (except herbs) in a non-reactive shallow skillet or sauce pan. If you are serving as antipasto, you can leaves the peppercorns and coriander seeds loose. If you are going to add the mushrooms to another dish, then you can put these into cheesecloth or a mesh tea ball. 
  3. Bring to the boil together, simmer for five minutes, stirring frequently.
  4. Allow to cool, then pack into a glass jar, adding fresh herb sprigs if desired. Refrigerate at least two days before serving. Will keep up to three weeks.

Side Note

 For our presentation with cannellini we made a mix of about 1/3 beans and 2/3 mushrooms. You could vary that ratio to suit your taste. We added some finely diced red bell pepper and fresh chopped parsley for color.  There’s plenty of flavor in the marinade, and you probably won’t need to add more salt or pepper, but a little drizzle of fresh olive oil would be welcomed.

You could call these pickled, or marinated. Whichever word you use, they are delicious and can be used in so many ways. We made a summer side dish from them by adding the  big, white Italian kidney beans, called cannellini. The mushrooms could be also be served just as they are as antipasto; chopped on bruschetta; tossed with pasta for a pasta salad; or as a garnish for fried fish or calamari.

 

St. Patrick’s Cabbage and Maitake Mushroom

Maitake (2)

Ingredients

  • 3 Tablespoons butter
  • 1 ½ cup sliced leeks
  • 4 cups thinly sliced green cabbage
  • 8 oz. MYCOPIA Maitake Frondosa mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 cup chicken or vegetable broth
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • A little fresh ground nutmeg (just a bit)

Directions

  1. Melt the butter over medium-low heat, add the leeks and cover tightly. Allow the leeks to cook until softened. Remove lid and stir one or twice to make sure the leeks aren’t scorching.
  2. Add cabbage, mushrooms and broth. Cover tightly and simmer until the cabbage is just cooked and still green.
  3. Season to taste. A little extra butter added at the end is tasty.

Side Note

Though we usually don’t associate St. Patrick’s Day with mushrooms, the Irish are quite fond of them, one favorite being the bolete, which the Italians call porcini, and the Irish call Penny Buns, for obvious reasons. Grifola Frondosa, aka Maitake, is not entirely unknown in Ireland and Scotland. The flavor goes well with cabbage, butter and leeks – with or without corned beef.